mindblowingscience
libutron:

Jordan’s Salamander - a salamander with peculiar courtship behavior
The Jordan’s Salamander or Red-cheeked salamander, Plethodon jordani (Plethodontidae), is a medium-sized (11.2 cm average length), blue-black terrestrial salamander found only in the Great Smokey Mountains National Park, eastern United States. This Near Threatened species can be identified by its bright cheek patches, which are usually red, but occasionally orange or yellow, and are brighter on younger individuals.
The mating behavior of Plethodon jordani is quite curious and complex. When the male first contacts a female he moves the length of her body and performs tapping, nudging, or head-sliding. He also may perform a foot dance with any of these modes of head contact. The male apparently identifies the sex and species of his sexual partner by chemoreception during these movements, and he also probably uses chemoreception to tell if the female is gravid. 
Once the male has contacted a female of his species, he locates her head. This is accomplished by trial and error because apparently the male has no means of distinguishing anterior from posterior as he moves along the length of the female. When the male reaches the female’s head he attempts to initiate a tail-straddling walk to deposit a spermatophore. The female must find the spermatophore and lower her abdomen over it to insert it into her cloaca.
Sometimes these salamander have homosexual courtships between males; this behavior has been considered a technique for sexual interference, inducing a rival male to deposit a spermatophore that serve no reproductive function (once a male has deposited a spermatophore, he usually does not court for several days).
References: [1] - [2] - [3]
Photo: ©Mike Graziano
Locality: Great Smoky Mountains National Park, United States

libutron:

Jordan’s Salamander - a salamander with peculiar courtship behavior

The Jordan’s Salamander or Red-cheeked salamanderPlethodon jordani (Plethodontidae), is a medium-sized (11.2 cm average length), blue-black terrestrial salamander found only in the Great Smokey Mountains National Park, eastern United States. This Near Threatened species can be identified by its bright cheek patches, which are usually red, but occasionally orange or yellow, and are brighter on younger individuals.

The mating behavior of Plethodon jordani is quite curious and complex. When the male first contacts a female he moves the length of her body and performs tapping, nudging, or head-sliding. He also may perform a foot dance with any of these modes of head contact. The male apparently identifies the sex and species of his sexual partner by chemoreception during these movements, and he also probably uses chemoreception to tell if the female is gravid. 

Once the male has contacted a female of his species, he locates her head. This is accomplished by trial and error because apparently the male has no means of distinguishing anterior from posterior as he moves along the length of the female. When the male reaches the female’s head he attempts to initiate a tail-straddling walk to deposit a spermatophore. The female must find the spermatophore and lower her abdomen over it to insert it into her cloaca.

Sometimes these salamander have homosexual courtships between males; this behavior has been considered a technique for sexual interference, inducing a rival male to deposit a spermatophore that serve no reproductive function (once a male has deposited a spermatophore, he usually does not court for several days).

References: [1] - [2] - [3]

Photo: ©Mike Graziano

Locality: Great Smoky Mountains National Park, United States

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fiftyshadesofdebauchery:

kvotheunkvothe:

Animal fun fact: Chinchillas can’t get wet. Their fur retains too much water and will start to grow mold. So they bathe by rolling around in dust.

Chinchilla fun fact: Chinchillas have around 20 hairs per follicle; unlike humans who have 2-3 hairs per follicle. Because their fur is so dense, they cannot get fleas or other parasites. The bugs will suffocate in their fur.

Chinchilla fun fact: Petting one of those awesome little guys feels like touching a motherfucking cloud.

Chinchilla fun fact: Their newborn babies are like little pieces of fluffy popcorn. You could easily just toss a handful in your mouth.

Chinchilla fun fact: Don’t toss a handful into your mouth.